Federal budget 2018: the devil's in the detail

Tax changes, space exploration, support for women in STEMM, housing affordability, the Great Barrier Reef and more: UNSW Sydney experts analyse key details of the budget.

A panel of UNSW Business School experts have assessed the 2018 federal budget - the major items and the details. The roundtable discussion was streamed live, and is available for viewing now.

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Professor Fiona Martin, UNSW Business School

UNSW Sydney's expert commentators give their opinions of the key points of the 2018 federal budget.
 

Richard Holden

Professor Richard Holden

Professor Richard Holden, UNSW Business School, explains why the budget was boring - but good.

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Kathrin Bain

Kathrin Bain, UNSW Business School, comments on the lack of real reform in the 2018 federal budget
 

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Professor John Piggott, from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR)

Professor John Piggott, from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR), says the 2018 federal budget could rightly be called a 'Baby Boomers' Budget'

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Professor Fiona Martin, UNSW Business School

UNSW Business School Professor Fiona Martin says it is a shame the 2018 budget did not do anything to help the long-term unemployed in Australia.

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Professor Kristy Muir, CEO at the Centre for Social Impact, says the 2018 federal budget did not include enough for vulnerable members of our society.

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Dr Chris Martin, of the City Futures Research Centre at UNSW Sydney, comments on the federal budget's disappointing lack of measures for housing affordability.

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Dr Sophie Lewis,  of the School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences at UNSW Canberra, comments on federal budget funding to protect the Great Barrier Reef

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Professor Helen Christensen, Director of the Black Dog Institute, reacts to the 2018 federal budget

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Professor Geoffrey Crisp, Pro-Vice Chancellor (Education) at UNSW Sydney, puts federal government restrictions on higher education into context.

Professor Geoffrey Crisp, Pro-Vice Chancellor (Education) at UNSW Sydney, responds to the 2018 federal budget and restrictions on higher education funding.

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Professor Christopher Pettit, of the City Futures Research Centre at UNSW Sydney, comments on the wins and losses for city infrastructure in the 2018 federal budget.

Professor Christopher Pettit, of UNSW Sydney City Futures Research Centre, comments on the wins and losses for infrastructure in cities.

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Dr Kate Wilson, Scientia Education Fellow, Senior Lecturer at SEIT says the 2018 federal budget measures to encourage more women into STEMM are just a start.

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Professor Russell Boyce, Director of UNSW Canberra Space, is delighted with government funding for a new Australian space agency in the 2018 federal budget.

UNSW Sydney will expand its Wagga Wagga Rural Clinical School to provide a complete medical degree, after a budget boost for rural medical training. 

Politicians are gaming the system politicians when they pull good news forward and push bad news back, writes Richard Holden.

The 2018 federal budget announced by Scott Morrison may be based on sound economics, but it is largely mundane in most areas.

Treasury should move beyond the current 'forward estimate period' and base budget calculations on much longer future timeframes.