climate change

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Australia's recent heatwave is a taste of what our future will bring unless humans can rapidly and deeply cut our greenhouse emissions, write Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick, Andrew King and Matthew Hale.

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Leading scientists, including Nobel Prize winner Peter Doherty, are calling on the Australian government to urgently fund research into the impact of climate change on human health.  

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Individuals can do a number of things to reduce the impact of heat in their homes but it gets more complicated when considering the city as a whole, write Mathew Lipson and Melissa Hart. 

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A rise in global temperatures of 2 degrees Celsius is likely to bring more extreme rainstorms to many parts of Australia even as other areas experience severe droughts, new research shows.  

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The influx of tropical fish due to climate change spells trouble for our kelp forests.

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From wearable sunburn sensors and radical environmental justice, to predicting deluge patterns and stopping HIV in its tracks, UNSW's inspiring young researchers are changing the face of the city.

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A panoramic exhibition that visually forecasts the global displacement of entire cultures will have its Australian premiere at UNSW Galleries on Saturday as part of the Sydney Festival.   

energy

In the absence of strong federal action on climate change, many states have developed their own climate and energy policies, write Anna Bruce, Graham Mills and Iain MacGill.

UNSOMNIA

Killer robots, disaster recovery, youth depression, climate change and rising inequality were among the pressing global issues tackled at UNSOMNIA, UNSW’s Grand Challenges launch event.

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In a ‘post-truth’ world of divisive debate, are we facing a crisis of confidence in knowledge and expertise? It’s one of the questions to be addressed at UNSOMNIA: What keeps me up at night? at UNSW this Thursday.

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