Darren Curnoe

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We may have finally said goodbye to the destructive personal attacks of the past and moved on to figuring out what the Hobbit really is, writes Darren Curnoe.

skulls

If similarities between the Xichang fossils and modern humans are reflective of shared ancestry, then interbreeding offers a plausible explanation, writes Darren Curnoe.

Venus of Willendorf

Were there any women around in the Palaeolithic Era? If popular culture is any guide you’d think not, writes Darren Curnoe.

Q fever

The changes we are making to the planet have become so profound that we seemingly hold the evolutionary fate of millions of species in our hands, writes Darren Curnoe.

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In the history of science, there is one error that beats out all others in terms of misery and that's the classification of humans into the different races, writes Darren Curnoe.

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This excerpt from The Best Australian Science Writing tells the story of how Darren Curnoe's discovery of primitive bones in a Chinese cave could overturn our understanding of where we came from.

crowd

It’s often said that through our innovations in science, agriculture and medicine humans have become masters of our biological destiny, writes Darren Curnoe.

neanderthal

One of the biggest surprises about our evolution is the extent our ancestors engaged in amorous congress with the evolutionary cousins, writes Darren Curnoe.

Lucy

A groundbreaking new study of the bones of our 3.2 million-year-old ancestor ‘Lucy’ has revealed she died from the crushing impact of a fall from high in the trees, writes Darren Curnoe.

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To have their greatest impact on society and truly advance their field of study, scientists must be willing to engage the public in open discussions about the good and the bad, including fraud, writes Darren Curnoe. 

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