dolphins

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A new article by a UNSW-led team could set a new course for wildlife biologists who are trying to reduce the threat of extinction.

dolphin

Size doesn't always matter when it comes to the pitch of your voice, especially if you're an aquatic mammal, write Kobe Martin and Tracey Rogers.

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A UNSW-led team of researchers studying dolphins that use sponges as tools has shown that social behaviour can shape the genetic makeup of an animal population in the wild.

Dolphin newsroom

A group of female dolphins has been learning from their mothers to use sponges to help catch fish for at least 180 years, a study has found.

Dolphin inside

Having good friends and relatives isn't only valued by humans. In dolphin "families", positive social interactions are more than twice as important as genes in determining successful reproduction, new research shows.