evolution

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Women take sexy selfies to compete with other women and climb the social ladder in economically unequal environments, new research suggests.

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Australian university students give far more credit than the previous generation to the science of human evolution and far less to creationism or divine guidance, according to a landmark new study. 

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Young women posting alluring photos of themselves online say less about gender discrimination – or those taking the sexy selfies – than about the economies they live in, writes Khandis Blake.

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Wild bilbies have learnt to avoid an old enemy, but are less cautious of a newer predator, new research suggests.

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A major study of dingo DNA has revealed the animals most likely migrated to Australia in two separate waves – a find with significant implications for their conservation.

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Geneticists have now firmly established that roughly 2% of the DNA of all living non-African people comes from our Neanderthal cousins, writes Darren Curnoe.

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UNSW Sydney scientists studying microbes from some of the saltiest lakes in Antarctica have discovered a new way that the tiny organisms can share DNA that could help them grow and survive.

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New claims that humans evolved in Europe rather than Africa need to be treated with a good deal of caution, writes Darren Curnoe.

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We may have finally said goodbye to the destructive personal attacks of the past and moved on to figuring out what the Hobbit really is, writes Darren Curnoe.

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Fish on the South Pacific island of Rarotonga evolved the ability to survive out of water because it helped them escape predators in the ocean, new research shows.

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