Federal Budget

Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex

Science has largely flown under the radar in a restrained Federal Budget, with no big spending measures and no major cuts apart from the university funding changes announced last week, writes Les Field.

House dream

The 'first home super saver scheme' is bad economics, somewhat costly, and a cruel hoax on prospective buyers who are struggling with an out-of-control housing market, writes Richard Holden.

innovation highway

UNSW's President and Vice-Chancellor Ian Jacobs argues the government’s plans for the university sector are not in the long-term interests of Australia or its economy.

Murchison Widefield Array

We need to support our world-class researchers and research infrastructure to create knowledge and innovation, rather than putting future wealth and well-being at risk by plundering science for short-term savings, writes Les Field.

Budget

We can’t expect the budget to be a perfect predictor of debt and deficits – not even one year ahead. But we should at least make sure we’re not conned by the treasurer, or commentators, writes Richard Holden.

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We know perfectly well how to reduce inequality and tackle political favouritism and rent-seeking. The question is almost entirely one of political will, write Gigi Foster and Paul Frijters.

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The bottom line for the government is that many of its policies will survive or fall in the Senate according to the will of the Palmer United Party, writes George Williams.

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At a cost of A$826 million, the processing and detention of around 2,500 asylum seekers on Nauru and Manus Island is a scandalous waste of taxpayers' money, write Joyce Chia and Claire Higgins.

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Public confidence will be shaken if it becomes acceptable for governments to jack up taxes because they don’t approve of previous policies, writes Richard Holden.

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Using temporary visas to supply lower skill personal carers is a short-sighted response to real problems of long-term under-investment in the disablity sector's greatest asset: its frontline workforce, argue Natasha Cortis and Shani Chan.

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