fossils

bat.jpg

The fossilised remains of a giant burrowing bat that lived in New Zealand millions of years ago have been found by a UNSW-led international team of scientists.

7_marsupial_lion_illustration_by_peter_schouten_in_the_journal_of_systematic_palaeontology.jpg

The discovery of a new species of marsupial lion in north-west Queensland provides important insight into what habitats were like in the past, writes Anna Gillespie.

marsupiallion.jpg

The fossil remains of a new species of tiny marsupial lion that prowled the lush rainforests of northern Australia about 18 million years ago have been unearthed in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area.

26whollydooley_devil.jpg

A new species of extinct flesh-eating marsupial that terrorised Australia’s drying forests about five million years ago has been identified from a fossil discovered in remote north-western Queensland.

mystacina_tuberculata_foraging_copyright_rod_morris.png

An ancient bat species has been discovered in New Zealand by UNSW palaeontologists, suggesting its descendants have been present in the country for at least 16 million years. 

Spermsiteartist 1

Preserved giant sperm from tiny shrimps that lived at least 17 million years ago have been discovered at the Riversleigh World Heritage Fossil Site by a team including UNSW researchers.

Platypus3 1

An extinct species of a carnivorous platypus about a metre long – the largest platypus ever found – has been discovered in the famous Riversleigh World Heritage Area by UNSW researchers.

06 Riversleigh archer original 1

A major new fossil site has been discovered by UNSW scientists beyond the boundaries of the famous Riversleigh World Heritage area in north-western Queensland. 

Robin

Two tiny fossils are prompting an overhaul of theories about marsupial evolution after they revealed unexpected links to South America - and possibly Africa.

Koalaskulls2

An extinct species of koala that lived in the rainforest canopies of northern Australia about 20 million years ago has been named after a famous Australian – Dick Smith.

Pages