privacy

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The succession of data access legislation in the Australian parliament is fast becoming a Mad Hatter's tea party. We need better oversight, and fast, writes Greg Austin.

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Consumers should not be blamed for failing to read online privacy policies. Instead, the system needs to be fixed.

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It is time the government used more accurate language so we can have a realistic debate about its plans for our personal information, write Katharine Kemp and David Vaile.

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It's time for a new discussion about the rules around privacy and politics in Australia, writes David Vaile, with the privacy interests of individuals front and centre.

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UNSW research shows that Australia is collecting more telecommunications metadata per capita than comparable nations, putting national security interests ahead of privacy concerns. 

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Metadata regulation is needed, but the legislation before the Australian Parliament contains major flaw, writes George Williams.

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Wearable consumer devices used to monitor health and fitness could become important sources of information for medical practitioners and insurance providers.

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A gaping hole lies in Australian law - there is no tort, or cause of action, enabling a person to sue for infringements of their privacy, writes George Williams.

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Posting information about our children on social media raises serious questions about their privacy now and in the future, writes Myra Hamilton.  

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Princess Kate's sudden centrefold status is unfortunate and ethically appalling. But if the royal minders really think it unexpected or unthinkable, perhaps they're the ones inhabiting a fairytale fiction, argues Emma Jane.