Professor Veena Sahajwalla

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The potential of emerging technologies was keenly discussed at a UNSW summit exploring the reinvention of Australian manufacturing.

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Burning materials that could be more productively reused elsewhere is not the way to go, UNSW Sydney has told an ACT government review.

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If waste is burned for energy, recyclable material is lost forever. There are better solutions, writes Veena Sahajwalla.

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UNSW's Professor Veena Sahajwalla says a solution is available now to the growing stockpiles of recyclable materials highlighted in a new Senate report into waste and recycling.

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As Australia's waste crisis escalates, Professor Veena Sahajwalla today launched the world's first e-waste microfactory which has the potential to reduce the vast amount of electronic waste heading into landfill.

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Micro-factories have enormous potential to reduce waste, create jobs and provide business opportunities if the government and businesses get behind them, writes Veena Sahajwalla.

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A revolutionary approach to the recycling of toxic waste materials has seen UNSW Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla awarded the inaugural PLuS Alliance Prize for Research Innovation.

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Professor Veena Sahajwalla has pioneered an Australian solution to the global e-waste crisis, developing microfactories to turn unwanted electronics into valuable metal alloys. 

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The quest to find innovative recycling methods to tackle growing amounts of waste across the globe has attracted researchers and industry delegates to UNSW for the International Sustainability Symposium.

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Sourcing raw materials from waste can cut costs, which means we need to look at our rubbish for its "beauty within," writes Veena Sahajwalla.

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