recycling

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Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla's work to revolutionise recycling via groundbreaking technologies developed at UNSW is being heard by a new, younger audience.

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Waste microfactories can transform the manufacturing landscape in Australia, especially in remote locations where waste transportation and processing are expensive.

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People are losing confidence in recycling and overwhelmingly want government to support solutions such as UNSW's groundbreaking microfactory technology, a new survey shows.

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Burning materials that could be more productively reused elsewhere is not the way to go, UNSW Sydney has told an ACT government review.

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If waste is burned for energy, recyclable material is lost forever. There are better solutions, writes Veena Sahajwalla.

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UNSW's Professor Veena Sahajwalla says a solution is available now to the growing stockpiles of recyclable materials highlighted in a new Senate report into waste and recycling.

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The world’s first microfactory that can transform the components from electronic waste (e-waste) items such as discarded smart phones and laptops into valuable materials for re-use has been launched at UNSW Sydney, with the Minister for the Environment, Gabrielle Upton, in attendance.

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Shopping for a mobile phone is confusing at the best of times, and trying to find an environmentally friendly option is even harder. UNSW's Miles Park provides some answers.

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Micro-factories have enormous potential to reduce waste, create jobs and provide business opportunities if the government and businesses get behind them, writes Veena Sahajwalla.

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Fish and chip packaging made of seaweed and a documentary about council clean-ups are among projects by UNSW design students at the Australian Design Centre’s Designing Bright Futures exhibition.

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