recycling

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The world’s first microfactory that can transform the components from electronic waste (e-waste) items such as discarded smart phones and laptops into valuable materials for re-use has been launched at UNSW Sydney, with the Minister for the Environment, Gabrielle Upton, in attendance.

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Shopping for a mobile phone is confusing at the best of times, and trying to find an environmentally friendly option is even harder. UNSW's Miles Park provides some answers.

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Micro-factories have enormous potential to reduce waste, create jobs and provide business opportunities if the government and businesses get behind them, writes Veena Sahajwalla.

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Fish and chip packaging made of seaweed and a documentary about council clean-ups are among projects by UNSW design students at the Australian Design Centre’s Designing Bright Futures exhibition.

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A UNSW Sustainability recycling program that diverts a tonne of batteries away from landfill has won a Green Gown Award for excellence in sustainability. 

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A UNSW Sustainability recycling program that diverts a tonne of batteries away from landfill each year is a finalist in the Green Gown Awards. 

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If Australia is to effectively manage e-waste, it needs to expand its National Waste Policy to include the recovery and recycling of a much wider range of electrical products, writes Graciela Metternicht.

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Australia’s management of electronic waste is poorly implemented, lags behind international best practice, and is based on outdated recycling targets, UNSW researchers say.

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Mixed plastic and glass waste is set to become a valuable commodity with the establishment of an $8.8 million “green manufacturing” research hub at UNSW led by Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla.

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The quest to find innovative recycling methods to tackle growing amounts of waste across the globe has attracted researchers and industry delegates to UNSW for the International Sustainability Symposium.

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