Richard Holden

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While US President Donald Trump is now being advised by a heterodox economist, the effects of the ongoing trade war with China may take time to become evident.

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US President Donald Trump's war of words with China over trade tariffs may have been vandalous, but could yet prove somewhat productive.

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The World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in the Swiss resort town of Davos has become a bit like the Academy Awards but it remains important for the Australian economy, writes Richard Holden.

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Cryptocurrencies could lead to significant losses in tax revenue, write Richard Holden and Anup Malani.

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The odds are that we get through 2018 without war, mass capital flight, or a housing crash. But all the risks are medium probability, warns Richard Holden, and the consequences could be dire.

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Troubling borrowing and lending markers in the Australian housing market suggest that the lessons from the US mortgage meltdown have not been learned, writes Richard Holden.

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Australia continues to see mixed signals across different aspects of the economic spectrum, writes Richard Holden.

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Business conditions aren't translating to confidence, despite growing profits and jobs, writes Richard Holden.

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The Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences has been awarded to Richard Thaler, an excellent choice that reflects an important shift in economics over the last three decades, Richard Holden writes.

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The market welcomed statements from the US Federal Reserve and the RBA, but there isn't much to be happy about.

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