UNSW Science

cave painting

Is it true that for our entire history humans have associated with about 150 other people? Darren Curnoe checks the facts.

polar bear

Australia is one of the few industrial nations going to Paris with inadequate emissions reduction targets – and with no credible policies to achieve even modest goals, writes Stefan Rahmstorf.

Horsehead nebula

A new telescope built in one of the most remote regions of our planet is letting us see cosmic carbon in a new light, writes Michael Burton.

Papua New Guinea

The big questions about our past, evolution and place in nature are getting harder to answer, writes Darren Curnoe

robot thinking

We are still a long way from fully understanding the complexities of how human empathy operates, writes Skye McDonald.

target

“Why wasn’t my grant funded?” Given most research funding agencies have success rates of 20% or less, this is a question asked by the majority of applicants every year, writes Merlin Crossley.

telescope

An international team of astronomers has used a new UNSW Australia telescope to help discover a large rocky object disintegrating in a death spiral around a distant white dwarf star.

oct_enso-update.jpg

This year’s El Niño, combined with the Indian Ocean Diople, could be a whopper, writes Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick, but we still don’t know exactly what weather the complex influences might produce.

Children learning

The key to avoiding silly mistakes is practising to the point where procedures become automatic, writes Greg Ashman.

neanderthal

DNA research has revealed some surprising aspects to our evolutionary history during the past 50,000 years, writes Darren Curnoe.

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