UNSW Science

desert mouse

Australia's arid grasslands are being invaded – by native shrubs and trees, write Mike Letnic and Christopher Edward Gordon.

 Milky Way

A huge galactic archaeology project called Galah is catching starlight to paint a picture of the galaxy's past, present and future, write Jonti Horner, Jonathan P. Marshall and Sarah Martell.

Fish at night

Light pollution is changing the day-night cycle of some fish, dramatically affecting their feeding behaviour, write UNSW's marine scientists.

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UNSW researchers have identified new brain pathways linked to addiction and shown that by manipulating them, drug seeking behaviour and motivation for alcohol can be reduced.

crowd

It’s often said that through our innovations in science, agriculture and medicine humans have become masters of our biological destiny, writes Darren Curnoe.

kelp

Cool-water kelp forests are vanishing, eaten by tropical species moving south on warming waters, write Adriana Vergés, Peter Steinberg and Thomas Wernberg.

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UNSW’s status as a scientific research powerhouse has been recognised in the latest Nature Index. 

sickle cell anemia

A new study has advanced the use of a technique known as 'CRISPR' to treat a common inherited form of anaemia, writes Merlin Crossley.

neanderthal

One of the biggest surprises about our evolution is the extent our ancestors engaged in amorous congress with the evolutionary cousins, writes Darren Curnoe.

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UNSW researchers have stood tall at the NSW Premier's Prizes for Science & Engineering, taking out awards in four of the nine categories.

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