UNSW Science

kelp

Cool-water kelp forests are vanishing, eaten by tropical species moving south on warming waters, write Adriana Vergés, Peter Steinberg and Thomas Wernberg.

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UNSW’s status as a scientific research powerhouse has been recognised in the latest Nature Index. 

sickle cell anemia

A new study has advanced the use of a technique known as 'CRISPR' to treat a common inherited form of anaemia, writes Merlin Crossley.

neanderthal

One of the biggest surprises about our evolution is the extent our ancestors engaged in amorous congress with the evolutionary cousins, writes Darren Curnoe.

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UNSW researchers have stood tall at the NSW Premier's Prizes for Science & Engineering, taking out awards in four of the nine categories.

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A new method for inducing visual hallucinations in healthy individuals could lead to new treatments for controlling them in people with Parkinson’s disease, UNSW researchers say.  

ideas

It's Spring, and time for four in five research funding applicants to hear the words, sorry, it's a no go, writes Rob Brooks.

sea wall

We've been building in the sea for centuries, and it's putting our oceans out of balance, write Katherine Dafforn, Mariana Mayer-Pinto and Nathan Waltham.

Lucy

A groundbreaking new study of the bones of our 3.2 million-year-old ancestor ‘Lucy’ has revealed she died from the crushing impact of a fall from high in the trees, writes Darren Curnoe.

Les Field

Graduates with STEM degrees have better employment outcomes and the skills and technology grounding needed to succeed in the world of tomorrow, writes Les Field.

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