Seeing the invisible: UNSW Galleries exhibition investigates design thinking

Unique insights into the diverse creative design processes used by artists are on show in the Make Known exhibiton at UNSW Galleries. 

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Ainslie Murray Everyday Life 2018, two-channel video and sound installation (video still). Courtesy of the artist.

UNSW Galleries opened Make Known: The Exquisite Order of Infinite Variation, an exhibition that looks at creative processes in art, design, and architecture, on Friday. 

UNSW Galleries Director José Da Silva said the exhibition presents ideas about creative design processes across a range of media and disciplines.

“Design thinking is increasingly recognised as an essential tool for addressing the challenges of the 21st century,” Mr Da Silva said.

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Grant Stevens Sky 2016, three-channel HD video with sound (video still). Courtesy of the artist and Sullivan + Strumpf, Sydney.

“In Make Known we see this in creative practices that use the exploratory processes of experimentation, intuition, and the prototyping and testing of models.”

Exhibition curator Eva Rodriguez Riestra said the exhibition features the work of artists, architects, and designers who often engage with invisible or imperceptible phenomena.

“Works in the exhibition consider atmospheric conditions, patterns of occupation and inhabitation, ground stability and fluctuations of ground water, movement, energy flows, fluid dynamics, and biological systems,” Ms Riestra said.

“The search and discovery of an emergent order in this phenomenon presents a unique insight into ways of apprehending and shaping the world.”

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Tricia Flanagan and Raune Frankjaer, Cyborganic BW-V2, 2013-2018. Natural fibres, video. Image: Tricia Flanagan

Exhibition highlights include Perdita Phillips’s major installation Tender Leavings (2016-18) containing fragments of 850 romance novels destroyed by termites, and Grant Stevens’s video installation Sky (2016) that explores the endless possibilities of digital imagery with computer-generated clouds.

Julie-Louise Bacon’s multimedia project Sentinel (2018) studies the evolution of communication with smoke signals and satellites, and Ainslie Murray’s Everyday Life (2018) project visualises airflow through architecture, performance, and engineering.

Make Known: The Exquisite Order of Infinite Variation was developed by UNSW’s Design Research Collaboration Research Cluster and is presented in collaboration with UNSW Built Environment.

The exhibition will run until 8 September 2018, presenting work by 19 practitioners and collaborative groups.

Exhibition details

Where: UNSW Galleries, corner Oxford Street and Greens Road, Paddington

When: 28 July-8 September 2018

Information, interviews and imagery: Karen Hall, Exhibitions Program Manager, k.hall@unsw.edu.au, +61 (0)425 759 658