Opinion

finance technology

Bank customers usually stay with their bank despite scandals in the sector, but new tech that gives consumers more information might help them switch, writes Rob Nicholls.

hot water bottle

Period pain usually begins soon after a girl starts menstruating, but commonly gets better as she gets older, writes Rebecca Deans.

shopper

Consumer confidence isn’t looking good, investor loans cause concern for the regulators, and Australia’s trade surplus sends the Aussie dollar soaring. If only we knew what President Trump will do next, writes Richard Holden.

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There is no doubt that plebiscites are powerful indicators of public opinion, but when it comes to complex public policy questions, they can detract from good decision-making, writes Jenny Stewart.

map

Australia is always on the move thanks to continental drift, which means the mapped coordinates of any place can get out of line with any GPS locating system, write Chris Rizos and Donald Grant.

Law

The new judicial appointments to the highest courts of Australia and the United States will bring more continuity than change to their respective courts, writes Rosalind Dixon.

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Spider silk is stronger than steel and Kevlar. Tapping into its secrets could herald a revolution in manufacturing, writes Sean Blamires.

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The built environment industry needs to meet its full responsibility to society by building more equitable and socially sustainable cities, writes Martin Loosemoore.

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Individuals can do a number of things to reduce the impact of heat in their homes but it gets more complicated when considering the city as a whole, write Mathew Lipson and Melissa Hart. 

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The rise of a "whatever it takes" approach in Australian politics poses a major challenge for Susan Kiefel, the newly installed leader of the Australian judiciary, writes George Williams.

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