Opinion

business investment

It's a puzzle why businesses are reasonably confident but not willing to invest in the future, writes Richard Holden.

disability

Shared ownership schemes can unlock access to suitable housing, although these are less common in Australia than overseas, write Ilan Wiesel and Karen R Fisher.

Q fever

The changes we are making to the planet have become so profound that we seemingly hold the evolutionary fate of millions of species in our hands, writes Darren Curnoe.

tax

Amid all the commotion around Donald Trump's plans to lower US company tax rates, you might have missed that Australia is also having a similar debate, writes Richard Holden.

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Calls to abandon imperfect student surveys and replace them with 'proper' measures of teaching effectiveness overlook the fact that no single, perfect alternative currently exists, writes Merlin Crossley.

finance technology

Bank customers usually stay with their bank despite scandals in the sector, but new tech that gives consumers more information might help them switch, writes Rob Nicholls.

hot water bottle

Period pain usually begins soon after a girl starts menstruating, but commonly gets better as she gets older, writes Rebecca Deans.

shopper

Consumer confidence isn’t looking good, investor loans cause concern for the regulators, and Australia’s trade surplus sends the Aussie dollar soaring. If only we knew what President Trump will do next, writes Richard Holden.

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There is no doubt that plebiscites are powerful indicators of public opinion, but when it comes to complex public policy questions, they can detract from good decision-making, writes Jenny Stewart.

map

Australia is always on the move thanks to continental drift, which means the mapped coordinates of any place can get out of line with any GPS locating system, write Chris Rizos and Donald Grant.

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