Earth and Environmental Sciences

The Murray-Darling river system
13 April 2012
More than 60 Australian scientists are calling for greater transparency with the Murray-Darling Basin Plan to ensure the river system's long-term sustainability.
Dryland biodiversity a key climate change buffer
13 January 2012
Preserving diverse plant life will be crucial to buffer the negative effects of climate change and desertification in in the world’s drylands, according to a new landmark study.
archaeopteryx_inside
28 October 2011
The 150-million-year-old Archaeopteryx fossil is still the first known bird despite an earlier study suggesting otherwise, new research reveals.
fire_inside
08 December 2010
The arrival of the first people in Australia some 50,000 years ago did not result in significantly greater fire activity, according to landmark research on the continent's fire history
flipper_inside
02 November 2010
Female dolphins who have help from their female friends are far more successful as mothers than those without such help, according to a landmark study.
Alex_jordan_inside
03 September 2010
Why aren't males even more promiscuous? Why are feelings of disgust so hard to shake? And why do some bad memories make you feel like a failure? UNSW's next generation of science researchers provide some answers.
fossilcave_inside
16 July 2010
The discovery of a remarkable 15-million-year-old Australian fossil cave packed with even older animal bones has revealed almost the entire life cycle of a large prehistoric marsupial.
Kingsford_wetlands_Inside
05 January 2010
The seemingly miraculous life-giving properties of water in Australia's parched heartlands are the subject of a documentary on ABC TV, featuring UNSW's Richard Kingsford.
wetlands_inside
04 November 2008
The largest ever survey of the health of Australia's vital wetlands is underway, with a team of UNSW environmental researchers conducting a special aerial survey of waterbirds across the entire continent.
Antarctica_web
19 January 2007
The predicted break-up of Antarctica's ice shelves due to global warming may trigger a major change in the marine food chain, by exposing its coastal seas to sunlight, according to new research by UNSW scientists.