Science & Tech

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From luxuries like champagne to the very livelihoods of fishing communities in the developing world – the climate-driven shifts in species will affect us all.

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Explorers from UNSW and Britain have discovered a colony of wild St Bernard dogs in a remote mountain range in southern Siberia – a remarkable find given St Bernards were previously thought to be native to Switzerland.

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What is our universe? Where did it come from? Associate Professor Sarah Brough studies rare mega-galaxies - thousands of times the size of the Milky Way - which she likens to interviewing elders about our past community.

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Sharing social knowledge is the foundation of our evolutionary success but in an age of unlimited information it's difficult to decide what to believe, writes Joseph Forgas.

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Changes in the distribution of land, marine and freshwater species as a result of climate change are affecting human wellbeing around the world, posing new health risks, economics threats and conflicts over resources.

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A UNSW-led fish farming research project in the remote PNG highlands is providing a valuable source of protein and income for locals and helping to reduce crime and tribal warfare.

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Nuclear weapons threaten not merely those who have them, but all people who walk the Earth, write Toby Walsh and Rob Brooks.

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UNSW Scientia Professor Michelle Simmons has received a €100,000 international L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Award at a ceremony in France, in recognition of her pioneering research in quantum physics.

plastic ocean

A new documentary highlights the plight of marine animals living among the estimated 5 trillion pieces of plastic rubbish generated by humans, writes Gary Truong.

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A proposal by a UNSW scientist to study the DNA of a wild-born Australian desert dingo called Sandy has been announced as one of five finalists in the World’s Most Interesting Genome competition.

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