Australian native mammals in focus

UNSW scientists are at the forefront of conserving, protecting and better understanding our Australian native mammals.

UNSW scientists will reintroduce burrowing bettongs, bilbies and other native mammals into large, predator-free enclosures in the state's west, as part of a new NSW Government initiative to protect threatened species.

Bilbies, bettongs and echidnas play a beneficial role in the arid environment by foraging for food – a behaviour that alters the composition of bacteria and fungi in the soil, UNSW research shows.

Urgent action is needed to protect large carnivores, such as the Australian dingo, from the “unforseen” environmental consequences that will accompany further declines in their numbers, an international team of ecologists has warned. 

Kangaroos may be nature's best hoppers, but when they are grazing on all fours – which is most of the time – their tail becomes a powerful fifth leg.

Although the ground-dwelling Mountain Pygmy-possum is highly vulnerable to extinction, it can be saved, write Hayley Bates and Haijing Shi.

I did not set out to be an advocate for keeping native animals as pets, but raising a western quoll, quite simply, changed my life, writes Michael Archer.