Adriana Verges

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Changes in the distribution of land, marine and freshwater species as a result of climate change are affecting human wellbeing around the world, posing new health risks, economics threats and conflicts over resources.

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The influx of tropical fish due to climate change spells trouble for our kelp forests.

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Cool-water kelp forests are vanishing, eaten by tropical species moving south on warming waters, write Adriana Vergés, Peter Steinberg and Thomas Wernberg.

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Tropical rabbitfish devastating algal forests in the eastern Mediterranean Sea pose a major threat to the entire sea basin if their distribution continues to expand as the climate warms, a UNSW-led study warns.

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The migration of tropical fish as a result of ocean warming poses a serious threat to the temperate areas they invade, because they overgraze on kelp forests and seagrass, a UNSW-led study concludes.