Andrew Dzurak

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A reimagining of today’s computer chips by UNSW engineers shows how a quantum computer can be manufactured – using mostly standard silicon technology.

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A reimagining of a modern computer chip by Australian engineers shows how a quantum computer can be manufactured – using mostly standard silicon components.

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​Physics World, the magazine of the UK’s Institute of Physics, has named an advance in quantum computing by engineers at UNSW among its global “Top Ten Breakthroughs of 2015”.

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A major advance on the road to building super fast quantum computers will be announced by UNSW researchers at a news conference to coincide with publication of their work in the global scientific journal, Nature.

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Two research teams working in the same UNSW laboratories have created quantum bits that offer parallel pathways for building quantum computers in silicon.

Bulb science

Five distinguished UNSW researchers have been recognised for excellence across three very different categories in this year's New South Wales Scientist of the Year awards.

Quantum

A research team led by Australian engineers has created the first working quantum bit based on a single atom in silicon, opening the way to ultra-powerful quantum computers of the future.

Research which changes our understanding of plant life around the world and work that brings the quantum computer one step closer to reality have won UNSW researchers top honours at the Eureka Prizes.

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A team led by UNSW engineers and physicists has achieved a breakthrough that brings a super-fast quantum computer a step closer to reality.

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The arrival of superfast quantum computing is closer following recent breakthroughs by an international team led by UNSW researchers.