Arne Laucht

Henry Yang and Andrew Dzurak

A proof-of-concept published today in Nature promises warmer, cheaper and more robust quantum computing. And it can be manufactured using conventional silicon chip foundries.

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UNSW engineers have created a new quantum bit that remains in a stable superposition for 10 times longer than previously achieved, dramatically expanding the number of calculations that could be performed in a future silicon quantum computer.

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Engineers from UNSW’s Centre for Quantum Computation & Communication Technology (CQC2T) have created a new quantum bit which remains in a stable superposition for 10 times longer than previously achieved, dramatically expanding the time during which calculations could be performed in a future

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A UNSW-led research team has encoded quantum information in silicon using simple electrical pulses for the first time, bringing affordable large-scale quantum computers one step closer to reality.