astronomy

An artist’s impression of the ring galaxy

An unusual galaxy is set to prompt a rethink on how structures in the Universe form.

The universe

Not only does a universal constant seem annoyingly inconstant at the outer fringes of the cosmos, it occurs in only one direction, which is downright weird.

Dark matter

Big galaxies get bigger by merging with smaller ones, modelling has shown.

Artist's interpretation of a protoplanetary disk

At only 1 per cent the age of the Sun, the DS Tuc binary system shows us how a planet might naturally develop before its orbit is disturbed by external forces.

The Crane

Astronomers have spotted something they weren't expecting – a star that has been travelling at 6 million kilometres an hour for 5 million years.

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A discovery led by UNSW Canberra scientist Ivo Seitenzahl opens the door on a new way of studying supernovae.

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UNSW astronomers have shown that binary stars – two stars locked in orbit around each other – reflect light as well as radiating it, revealing new ways for their detection.

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UNSW scientists have led the launch of a revolutionary new Australian instrument to detect small planets orbiting sun-like stars.

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The galaxy is rich in grease-like molecules, according to an Australian-Turkish team.

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UNSW Canberra researchers are closer to understanding how stars evolve and explode as supernovae, producing elements necessary for forming life on Earth.

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