astronomy

The Crane

Astronomers have spotted something they weren't expecting – a star that has been travelling at 6 million kilometres an hour 5 million years.

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A discovery led by UNSW Canberra scientist Ivo Seitenzahl opens the door on a new way of studying supernovae.

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UNSW astronomers have shown that binary stars – two stars locked in orbit around each other – reflect light as well as radiating it, revealing new ways for their detection.

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UNSW scientists have led the launch of a revolutionary new Australian instrument to detect small planets orbiting sun-like stars.

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The galaxy is rich in grease-like molecules, according to an Australian-Turkish team.

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UNSW Canberra researchers are closer to understanding how stars evolve and explode as supernovae, producing elements necessary for forming life on Earth.

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UNSW scientists will co-lead the fastest ever survey of stars in our galaxy, following the launch of a revolutionary Australian instrument that can observe more than a million stars a year.

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What is our universe? Where did it come from? Associate Professor Sarah Brough studies rare mega-galaxies - thousands of times the size of the Milky Way - which she likens to interviewing elders about our past community.

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A study of the internal sound waves created by starquakes, which make stars ring like a bell, has provided unprecedented insights into conditions in the turbulent gas clouds where stars were born 8 billion years ago.

Horsehead nebula

A new telescope built in one of the most remote regions of our planet is letting us see cosmic carbon in a new light, writes Michael Burton.

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