bushfires

Tap water

We’re tapping into UNSW Engineering Professor Stuart Khan's expertise on water quality and how to keep your drinking water safe as the Australian bushfires continue.

Burnt bushland in Iluka NSW

The Dean of UNSW Built Environment says it’s possible to build more fire resistant homes, but designs need to use best practice principles to be resilient.

raindbow lorikeet

A UNSW studio led by renowned landscape architect Professor Richard Weller has come up with a unique way to protect our threatened species.

eyes

Another troubling consequence of the bushfire smoke is its effects on our eyes. But there are some steps we can take to minimise irritation and any risk of longer-term harm.

Woman with difficulty breathing

Particulates in fire smoke can irritate the lining of the respiratory tract, causing throat irritation, coughing and breathing difficulties.

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UNSW academics are available for interview on the bushfires, discussing links to climate change, and how fires affect our health and water supplies.

bushfire kangaroo

In a matter of weeks, the fires have subverted decades of dedicated conservation efforts for many threatened species.

bushfire

Air purifiers with a HEPA filter are an expensive option. Plugging ventilation holes in walls helps, but there are also dangers.

Tap water

Professor Stuart Khan from UNSW Sydney explains the immediate and long-term effects of bushfires on water quality.

Professor Michael Sherris

Professor Michael Sherris from the School of Risk and Actuarial Studies provides his insights on the potential impact of bushfires on insurance premiums and the implications of underinsurance.

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