cancer

2019 Tall Poppy awards

Leading UNSW academics have won 2019 Young Tall Poppy Science Awards for their work in the treatment of pancreatic cancer and the prevention of HIV and sexually transmitted infections.

Hiv Model

Leading UNSW Sydney medical researchers are finalists at the 2019 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes, Australia's most high-profile science awards.

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A 3D printer that can print replicas of different types of cancers and surrounding cells has won one of Australia's major design awards.

Angelica Merlot in the lab

Scientia Fellow Angelica Merlot is determined to outmanoeuvre some of the deadliest cancers.

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UNSW medical data researcher Dr Kalinda Griffiths has won a major award from the Lowitja Institute for her research into health inequalities across Australia.

Nanomedicine

The new sensor can detect very low concentrations of cancer markers in blood tests and is among new technologies to be presented at the 10th annual International Nanomedicine Conference.

How do people get cancer?

What is cancer – the deadly disease that affects the lives of millions of people around the world each year? And… why do some people get it, and others not? 

Micro-submarines travelling in the human body

UNSW engineers have shown that micro-submarines powered by nano-motors could navigate the human body to provide targeted drug delivery to diseased organs without the need for external stimulus.

Jake Chua

A newly identified mechanism that regulates a particular enzyme could lead to the development of new, cholesterol-lowering drugs.

Chemotherapy patient

More than 15 million people each year will need chemotherapy by 2040, a landmark study published today by a team of Australian researchers has shown. 

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