cancer

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Eating processed meat like bacon every day in no way gives you the same cancer risk as if you smoked a pack of cigarettes each day, but there is a danger all the same, writes Bernard Stewart.

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Patients with hard-to-treat tumours could know within six months whether a cancer drug developed at UNSW is more effective than traditional chemotherapy, allowing them to live a relatively normal life during treatment.

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UNSW researchers have topped the state in the 2015 Cancer Institute NSW Research Equipment Grants, winning a combined $1.7 million in funding.

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After testing 70 different drugs over 10 years, Australian cancer researchers have discovered a new drug that holds great promise for treating children with an aggressive form of leukaemia.

Chemicals

Environmental chemical exposure is a valid concern, but the evidence does not support hyperbolic claims that we are swimming in a soup of cancer-causing chemicals, writes Darren Saunders. 

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Her vision is to use nanotechnology to deliver drugs and gene-silencing therapies directly to cancer cells. He is a social scientist with an interest in the social and ethical issues of technological change. 

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Research assessing the impact of genomic testing on women with a high-risk of developing breast cancer has received backing in the latest round of funding from the Cancer Council NSW.

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A new gene sequencing technology being used to map the human genome is set to transform the diagnosis of cancer and other diseases, potentially saving lives.

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Professor Martina Stenzel is working with shape shifting polymers to target cancer. For more videos visit the UNSWTV homepage.

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Cancer screening is beneficial when it prevents people from dying. But using cancer survival rates to promote screening, as is often done, is misleading, write Katy Bell, Alexandra Barratt and Andrew Hayen.

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