Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology

Professor Veena Sahajwalla and federal Environment Minister Sussan Ley

The revolutionary technology developed at UNSW Sydney positions Australia at the forefront of how we re-use discarded materials.

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UNSW Sydney's Professor Veena Sahajwalla is leading a team producing high-quality building products made from old clothing and mixed waste glass.

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Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla's work to revolutionise recycling via groundbreaking technologies developed at UNSW is being heard by a new, younger audience.

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Burning materials that could be more productively reused elsewhere is not the way to go, UNSW Sydney has told an ACT government review.

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If waste is burned for energy, recyclable material is lost forever. There are better solutions, writes Veena Sahajwalla.

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There’s much more at stake at Australian steelmaker Arrium than today’s jobs, writes Veena Sahajwalla.

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Green manufacturing in micro-factories offers an exciting future for regional Australia, writes Veena Sahajwalla.

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The Science 50:50 initiative has a simple premise – since half of the population is female, why not also half the scientists and technologists?

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Waste tyres diverted from landfill by UNSW ‘green steel’ technology could reach as high as the International Space Station.

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Mixed plastic and glass waste is set to become a valuable commodity with the establishment of an $8.8 million “green manufacturing” research hub at UNSW led by Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla.

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