childhood cancer

Orazio Vittorio

Childhood cancer researcher Dr Orazio Vittorio has received a 2021 Young Tall Poppy Science Award for his work in developing treatments for childhood cancers.

sick child

A new drug may offer improved treatment options for a type of childhood cancer down the track, a study in animal models has shown.

Robot in classroom

Most school students are back in school after a tumultuous school year, but remote learning – and social isolation – is an ongoing reality for thousands of sick children around the country.

legs of patient kid in blue patient suit sitting on sofa and touch or press on her abdomen with her doll.

Australia’s Zero Childhood Cancer program has so far identified the genetic basis of a child’s cancer in more than 90 per cent of cases, new research shows.

Young boy eating an apple

Fussy eating and taste changes are common side effects of cancer treatment – now, a healthy eating program designed by UNSW medical researchers is helping parents get their child’s diet back on track.

Dr Orazio Vittorio. Image: Children's Cancer Institute

Cancer researcher Orazio Vittorio was completing his PhD when a tumour started to grow in his kidney. After an accidental diagnosis at university, an emergency surgery by his supervisor saved his life. 

Boy flexing

Just one exercise physiology consultation is enough to improve motivation and exercise levels among most child cancer survivors, a UNSW Sydney study has found. 

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UNSW Medicine Professor and SHARP hire Claire Wakefield is all about listening to and acting on others’ needs – whether it’s a family with a sick child, or an early-career researcher in need of leadership mentoring.

 

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A new study by UNSW medical researchers sheds light on an understudied area – community beliefs about what causes cancer in children.

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UNSW's Dr Ursula Sansom-Daly has received a $60,000 grant to develop a training program for healthcare professionals on how to have end-of-life conversations with young cancer patients.

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