China

JW Nevile Fellow in Economics Tim Harcourt, UNSW Business School.

Trade tensions will resolve themselves because of China's economic needs, says international trade expert.

A collection of terracotta sculptures depicting the armies of Qin Shi Huang.

Digital transformation is not just about technology – it is about people and processes, says UNSW Business School’s Yenni Tim. 

USA and China paper boats

As tensions in the disputed waters mount, it's important to understand how this conflict began and what international law says about freedom of navigation and competing maritime claims.

Boy eating an ice cream on an abandoned street in China

A UNSW report considers China’s children affected by migration and climate change, and the necessary social policy reforms required to protect their rights. 

Prison cell

Two UNSW academics advise on the Australian government’s warning Australians could be ‘at risk of arbitrary arrest’ in China.

A busy pedestrian mall in south China surrounded by skyscrapers

A UNSW creative producer is harnessing the cultural differences and parallels between China and Australia to produce innovative new urban media.

Hacker prints code on laptop keyboard to break into organisation's system

The announcement of the biggest-ever funding package to combat cyberattacks confirms just how vulnerable Australia’s cybersecurity really is – but not because of China.

China-Australia trade

UNSW academics offer differing solutions in the attempt to ‘cool down’ rising trade tensions between Australia and China.

Tim Harcourt

The US is still an important market for Australia but ultimately an international multilateral-based trading system is better than the US having deals of managed trade around the world, says JW Nevile Fellow in Economics Tim Harcourt.

Murray Darling basin

China felt the Murray Darling Basin Plan was about more than the environment. It wanted to know how much more.

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