Chris Turney

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Sydney has joined more than 600 local governments around the world – as well as the national governments of the UK and Canada – in putting the climate crisis at the heart of all policy decisions.

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The move has been likened to putting the country on a "war footing", with climate and the environment at the very centre of all government policy, rather than being on the fringe of political decisions.

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The loss of the Siberian unicorn shows just how vulnerable some animals can be to environmental change that can impact on their food supply.

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As climate extremes mount, let's reflect on Victorian London's 'Great Stink' sewage crisis - when things finally became so bad authorities were forced to accept evidence, reject sceptics, and act.

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A radiocarbon 'golden spike' found in a tree on an island in the Southern Ocean marks a new geological epoch during which human activity has been a dominant influence on earth.

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With global sea levels set to rise by up to a metre by 2100, there is much to be learnt from past changes to the coastline and how humans responded to dramatic increases in sea level.

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On February 11, 1913, the world woke to the headline “Death of Captain Scott. Lost with four comrades. The Pole reached. Disaster on the return”. A keenly anticipated, privately funded scientific venture “off the map” had turned to tragedy, writes Chris Turney.

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The 1912 death of Scott of the Antarctic and four companions has long been blamed on poor planning by Scott, but documents discovered by a UNSW researcher reveal a different story – and a possible cover up.

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The 1912 death of Scott of the Antarctic and four companions has long been blamed on poor planning by Scott, but documents discovered by a UNSW researcher reveal a different story – and a possible cover up.

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A kauri tree preserved for 30,000 years has revealed a new explanation for how temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere spiked several degrees centigrade in just a few decades during the last global ice age.

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