Chris Turney

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A radiocarbon 'golden spike' found in a tree on an island in the Southern Ocean marks a new geological epoch during which human activity has been a dominant influence on earth.

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With global sea levels set to rise by up to a metre by 2100, there is much to be learnt from past changes to the coastline and how humans responded to dramatic increases in sea level.

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On February 11, 1913, the world woke to the headline “Death of Captain Scott. Lost with four comrades. The Pole reached. Disaster on the return”. A keenly anticipated, privately funded scientific venture “off the map” had turned to tragedy, writes Chris Turney.

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The 1912 death of Scott of the Antarctic and four companions has long been blamed on poor planning by Scott, but documents discovered by a UNSW researcher reveal a different story – and a possible cover up.

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The 1912 death of Scott of the Antarctic and four companions has long been blamed on poor planning by Scott, but documents discovered by a UNSW researcher reveal a different story – and a possible cover up.

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A kauri tree preserved for 30,000 years has revealed a new explanation for how temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere spiked several degrees centigrade in just a few decades during the last global ice age.

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New research has prompted warnings that melting Antarctic ice can trigger effects on the other side of the globe. 

Antarctic ice

Current changes in the ocean around Antarctica are disturbingly close to conditions 14,000 years ago that led to the rapid melting of the Antarctic ice sheets and a three metre rise in global sea levels, new research shows.

Antarctic research

Research expeditions shouldn't need to rely on governments for funding, write Chris Turney and Christopher Fogwill.

1912 drought

The dominant theme of Australia’s drought history is variability, write Patrick Baker, Chris Turney and Jonathan Palmer.

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