coastal erosion

Bondi beach

A new study has reported the world will lose almost half of its valuable sandy beaches by 2100 as sea levels rise. But cutting our emissions could keep some intact.

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The world’s most extensive study of the impacts of coastal storm fronts in a changing climate has found that rising seas are no longer the only threat.

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Storms that battered Australia's east coast are a harbinger of things to come and a stark reminder of the need for a national effort to monitor the growing threat from climate change, UNSW coastal researchers warn.

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Researchers at the UNSW Water Research Laboratory have been tracking the variability, changes and trends in coastal erosion at Narrabeen-Collaroy since 1976. In April 2015, a severe east coast low battered the coastline of Sydney, with maximum waves reaching a record-breaking 14.9m.

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One of the world’s longest-running beach erosion research programs is calling for the creation of a National Coastline Observatory, saying Australian governments are 'working blind' on the impacts of climate change on our coast.