constitutional recognition

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Indigenous people feel powerless in their own country and this was articulated in the Uluru Statement from the Heart, writes Harry Hobbs.

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A simple referendum question about consitutional change would leave the parliament to handle the detail of how to give Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders a voice in the legislative process, writes Rosalind Dixon.

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The 1967 referendum fell far short in giving people what they thought they were voting for, and in giving Aboriginal people what they wanted from it, write Gabrielle Appleby and Gemma McKinnon. 

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A vote on constitutional recognition of Indigenous Australians is unlikely before 2018. But Paul Kildea warns that the longer the consultation process goes on, the more debate is likely to split and fracture.

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UNSW is delighted to announce that award-winning journalist and author Stan Grant will deliver a major public lecture at the University in July.

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If we are to forge a way ahead on Indigenous recognition in the constitution, it must be through political leadership and genuine public consultation, writes Paul Kildea.

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Human rights lawyer Professor Megan Davis has been elected Chair of the United Nation's permanent forum on Indigenous issues.

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A national people’s convention on constitutional recognition for Indigenous people could be the circuit breaker the drifting issue needs, writes Paul Kildea.

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More political leadership is needed if the push for constitutional recognition is to emerge from its prolonged holding pattern, writes Paul Kildea.

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Gandhi’s lifelong fight against British Imperialism bears similarity to Indigenous Australia’s push for constitutional recognition, Professor Patrick Dodson told an audience at UNSW's inaugural Gandhi Oration.

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