COVID-19

stuart_turville_kirby.jpg

What goes on in the life of an immunologist during a pandemic? Associate Professor Stuart Turville from UNSW Sydney and the Kirby Institute's Immunovirology and Pathogenesis Program takes us through a day in the life of an immunologist. Images: Richard Freeman

lockdown graphic

From the things you choose to focus on, to the support you seek from others, to the way you look after your physical health — these coping strategies could help you through Melbourne's latest lockdown.

A woman peers out at the city from a hotel room some floors up

The Federal government has just announced it will help fund the building of a quarantine facility in Victoria; meanwhile UNSW academics wonder why it has taken this long.

A health care worker receiving a vaccine

If new incentives don't work, mandatory policies may be the only way forward in ensuring high COVID vaccine coverage of staff.

variant of SARS-CoV-2

Associate Professor Stuart Turville from UNSW Sydney and the Kirby Institute's Immunovirology and Pathogenesis Program explains how variants emerge, how they are detected and what we know about the B.1617 variant.

stuart turville

Associate Professor Stuart Turville from UNSW Sydney’s Kirby Institute leads a team that has developed genetically “supercharged” cells to quickly understand

kirby cells

In this video, watch how the SARS-CoV-2 virus takes over cells by ‘melting’ them into each other.

Vaccination centre

In the end, the best protection is mass vaccination and ensuring as many people as possible are fully vaccinated as quickly as possible.

a large group of racially diverse people

Community leaders or trusted work colleagues can be COVID vaccine advocates and help boost vaccination rates. Here are some simple steps they can take.

Pages