CQC2T

artist's impression of an atom qubit in silicon being protected from charge noise

A team led by 2018 Australian of the Year Professor Michelle Simmons has taken another important step forward in the development of a silicon quantum computer.

2-qubit gate

The team of physicists at UNSW Sydney led by 2018 Australian of the Year Professor Michelle Simmons have built a super-fast version of the central building block of a quantum computer. The research is a milestone result of a vision first outlined by scientists 20 years ago.

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The Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Quantum Computation and Communication Technology at UNSW Sydney has been officially launched. 

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Scientists from around the world are meeting in Sydney to discuss the latest advancements in silicon quantum computing.

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Two fundamental quantum techniques have been combined by a UNSW team in a integrated silicon chip for the first time, confirming the promise of using silicon for quantum computing.

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Ask a quantum physicist to draw a chair and the result can be a fundamental shift in how they see the world.

 

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Hundreds of school students got a rare peek into what life as a scientist could be like, as Professor Michelle Simmons opened the doors of the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology ahead of National Science Week.

The frequency spectrum of an engineered molecule

Australian scientists have achieved a new milestone in their approach to creating a quantum computer chip in silicon, demonstrating the ability to tune the control frequency of a qubit by engineering its atomic configuration.

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The race is on to build the first reproducable two qubit gate in silicon - the building block for a scalable silicon-based quantum computer. UNSW Sydney-led scientists have shown for the first time that they can make two precisely placed phosphorous atom qubits “talk” to each other.

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A reimagining of today’s computer chips by UNSW engineers shows how a quantum computer can be manufactured – using mostly standard silicon technology.

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