Darren Curnoe

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A manifesto from 23 researchers challenges old models, and outlines the major new directions archaeology should follow to solve the puzzling origins of modern humans.

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Darren Curnoe reports on his recent excavation at the famous Niah Caves in Borneo.

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A UNSW-led geological analysis of the site where a 6000-year old human skull was discovered in Papua New Guinea in 1929 has revealed that the person most likely died in a catastrophic tsunami.

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The development of agriculture marked the greatest shift in human history, but it came with consequences, writes Darren Curnoe.

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Geneticists have now firmly established that roughly 2% of the DNA of all living non-African people comes from our Neanderthal cousins, writes Darren Curnoe.

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New claims that humans evolved in Europe rather than Africa need to be treated with a good deal of caution, writes Darren Curnoe.

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The human brain is unique in many ways including the amount of asymmetry that exists between its left and right sides, writes Darren Curnoe. 

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We may have finally said goodbye to the destructive personal attacks of the past and moved on to figuring out what the Hobbit really is, writes Darren Curnoe.

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If similarities between the Xichang fossils and modern humans are reflective of shared ancestry, then interbreeding offers a plausible explanation, writes Darren Curnoe.

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Were there any women around in the Palaeolithic Era? If popular culture is any guide you’d think not, writes Darren Curnoe.

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