data privacy

A person shopping online on a laptop

Consumers should have more control over how online marketplaces such as eBay and Amazon collect and use their data, according to a new ACCC report.

person holding a smartphone with a shopping list on screen in front of an open fridge

We are connecting ourselves, our homes and our workplaces to lots of internet-enabled devices: smartwatches, smart lightbulbs, toasters, fridges … How to keep all their data private?

Magnifying glass being held up to Google's Privacy & Terms page

A proposed online privacy code would give consumers more control over how tech companies collect and use their data.

Someone looking at their phone infront of their laptop with the 'Google' page open.

The current review of the Federal Privacy Act could be the beginning of a process to obtain fairer privacy practices for consumers. But any reforms from this review will be a long time coming.

a finger points to an electronic control panel

The Internet of Things will transform industry, agriculture, and our cities. But we need to consider carefully the risks as well as the rewards.

a digital hand unlocking a digital padlock

Differences in US privacy legislation present a challenge for the rest of the world, UNSW Law's David Vaile told a forum on global data protection.

Google logo reflected in an eye

Following a privacy policy change in 2016, Google has collected users' data from third-party websites and apps. The ACCC argues users were misled into signing away their privacy.

Woman walking through busy street with mobile phone

While the government's COVIDSafe Bill has made significant improvements in the last two weeks, substantial concerns remain, according to UNSW experts.

commuters walk through a busy sunny street

UNSW experts discuss the improvements and remaining deficiencies of the Bill and why the “Google knows everything about you anyway” argument is insufficient.

A woman wearing a protective mask and gloves uses a mobile phone

The lack of information on the contact-tracing app raises questions about its potential for success and future repurposing, says data surveillance and privacy expert.

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