David Sanderson

earthquake in nepal

A new UN-HABITAT global lecture from UNSW Professor David Sanderson provides ten takeaways for improving humanitarian action after disasters.

Mumbai slum

Many are speculating about the pandemic changing how we plan and use our cities. What they overlook is how many people live in unplanned settlements where it's more likely to be business as usual.

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The disasters have come one after another. While they may not be entirely preventable, we can take many practical steps tailored to local needs and conditions to reduce the impacts on our cities.

Ebola warning

No continent is more vulnerable to the COVID-19 pandemic. The most vulnerable people pay the highest price, and this time Africa will struggle to get help as other nations fight their own battles.

Kathmandu earthquake

A new research initiative aims to reduce vulnerability in urban environments.

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There are currently more recorded refugees than any point in history, most of whom live in cities that are not equipped to handle their unique experiences and needs.

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Professor David Sanderson will steer investigation of the pressing issues of rapid urbanisation, including threats facing low-income urban settlements.

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Early in his architectural career Professor David Sanderson had an epiphany while working at a low income housing project that changed his career direction to one of an aid worker. He is the editor of the 2016 Red Cross World Disasters Report.

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UNSW architecture and urban design experts on what they would love to see in their city.

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Join UNSW President and Vice-Chancellor, Professor Ian Jacobs and 12 UNSW experts as they share what keeps them up at night. UNSOMNIA - Thursday December 1st, Leighton Hall UNSW.

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