DNA

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An international study has provided compelling evidence that we inherit more than a DNA blueprint from our mothers and fathers – we also inherit vital instructions on how to use this blueprint.

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A wild-born, pure Australian desert dingo called Sandy Maliki has taken out first place in the World’s Most Interesting Genome competition. Her DNA will be decoded using the latest genome sequencing technology. 

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Explorers from UNSW and Britain have discovered a colony of wild St Bernard dogs in a remote mountain range in southern Siberia – a remarkable find given St Bernards were previously thought to be native to Switzerland.

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UNSW and Harvard researchers have identified a critical step in the molecular process that allows cells to repair damaged DNA – and it could mean big things for the future of anti-ageing drugs, childhood cancer survivors and even astronauts.

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It’s no exaggeration to say that genetic research is rewriting our understanding of the human evolutionary story, writes Darren Curnoe.

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The discovery that starlings carrying a new mutation in their mitochondria, the energy powerhouses of cells, almost tripled their population within five years has important implications for mitochondrial diseases in humans.

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UNSW scientists have discovered a link between autism and genetic changes in some segments of DNA that are responsible for switching on genes in the brain.

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The ability to edit the genome using new DNA-cutting tools is heralding a new age of genetic engineering, writes Merlin Crossley.

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New results confirm we are on the right track to understanding how molecules that coat DNA influence the activity of disease genes, writes Merlin Crossley.

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UNSW scientists have achieved a world first, publishing the complete DNA sequence of the Queensland fruit fly – a development that will improve both biosecurity and methods for controlling this global horticultural pest.

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