Economics

Healthcare workers

UNSW has a wide range of experts available for comment on the coronavirus pandemic.

vital signs

Businesses won't employ more people unless they are prepared to invest. Figures out on Thursday suggest they are.

Young woman sits facing two interviewers

Labour market scarring can have a lifelong effect on people’s earnings and their ability to climb the employment ladder, says UNSW Business School's Richard Holden.

Complex audio visual computer

The dark side of 'financialisation' is well-known. But it's not all bad news.

Two co-workers wearing masks and greeting each other in the office.

Business leaders need to address questions on work processes, performance and virtual teams to improve productivity and engagement through the COVID-19 induced recession, says UNSW Business School.

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A high unemployment rate isn't just bad for individuals without a job, and the costs aren't just financial.

Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo

Nobel Prize winners Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee reveal how economics can help solve the thorniest social and political problems of our time.

1971 Holden Mercury Silver ute

There's a strong case for more strategic local manufacturing. There's little case for making cars and trains in Australia.

An image of the Australian flag and a sign with 'Budget 2020' on the left.

With the government taking on record debt in a bid to pull Australia out of recession, infrastructure-related spending must be carefully managed, says UNSW Business School.

2020 Federal Budget report

The government has brought forward planned tax cuts. And while some say we shouldn't be cutting taxes during a recession, the plan has its merits.

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