Economics

dollar

​The RBA keeps interest rates on hold and China delivers good news, but there are still pockets of concern in global economies, writes Richard Holden.

Hillary Clinton

Despite the rhetoric, Hillary Clinton's economic plans are mostly centrist, largely sensible and hardly stuff of the radical left, writes Richard Holden.

wall cracks

The RBA leaves rates on hold, Australia gets a GDP growth spurt from pre-election spending, and the IMF lays the groundwork for a lowering of global growth expectations, writes Richard Holden.

shopping

Jobs data lowers the likelihood of a US interest rate hike, Australian business investment beats expectations, but retail trade remains flat, writes Richard Holden.

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The US Federal Reserve's annual meeting will signal interest rates, and ultimately the path of the Aussie dollar, writes Richard Holden.

Richard Holden

Governments have never been good at deciding how many people can study what, writes Richard Holden.

buckets

The US economy is looking healthy, but in Australia there’s only so much monetary stimulus can do when it comes to low inflation, writes Richard Holden.

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With the Rio Games underway, UNSW experts are available for comment on issues from doping in sport and the threat from Zika, to the economics of the Olympics spectacle.

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Australia's gloomy economic outlook has not been helped by the big four banks' decision to hold back on interest rate cuts, writes Richard Holden. 

train set

The most interesting numbers at the moment are the yields on long term government securities, writes Richard Holden.

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