Economics

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Large numbers of people and households would not be prepared or adequately supported in the event of a financial shock, finds a new report from Kristy Muir and Axelle Marjolin.

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The US economy looks to be improving but Richard Holden warns that Australia is on shaky ground with low interest rates, high household debt and the Aussie dollar on the rise again.

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Economic data is thin on the ground as central bankers converge on Jackson Hole for their annual meet and greet, writes Richard Holden.

australia economy

Australia’s economic growth is unsurprisingly paltry, the RBA leaves the cash rate on hold, and Australians continue to eat away at their savings, writes Richard Holden.

salary

Investor loans continue to rise, unemployment ticks down, wages growth remains distressingly low and consumers are unconvinced the budget will improve their financial situation, writes Richard Holden.

bank robbery

Given the lack of competition in the sector, it won’t be the banks’ shareholders who pay for the new $6 billion levy. It will be mortgage holders and other customers, writes Richard Holden.

US money

The value of the US-Australia economic relationship is not necessarily obvious, write Richard Holden, Simon Jackman and Jared Mondschein.

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Policy experts from UNSW are available to give analysis of the 2017 Federal Budget when it is handed down on Tuesday 9 May 2017.

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The Australian construction industry employs over 1.1 million people, but it needs a clear strategy to become a global competitor in the construction race, writes Martin Loosemoore. 

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UNSW's newest Grand Challenge will focus on conversations about poverty, disadvantage and inequality, while connecting to broader trends in democratic politics. 

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