energy

Solar cells, wind turbines and structures that house the electrolyser to create hydrogen

The green hydrogen revolution is coming, and Australia is perfectly placed to take advantage of it, an analysis of production costs by UNSW engineers has shown.

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“The time of solar has arrived and this is good news for the world.”

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The case for hydrogen as a fuel has been well made but there has been little investment to bring it to scale.

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The energy required to power the massive, factory-sized data centres that computers rely on already consumes 5% of global electricity. And that energy load is doubling every decade.

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Moving to a future powered mainly by renewable energy will be crucial if we are to stay within the global warming limits set out by the Paris Agreement.

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A laser-driven technique for creating fusion that dispenses with the need for radioactive fuel elements and leaves no toxic radioactive waste is now within reach, says a UNSW physicist.

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When it comes to energy, governments are lacking the expertise that engineers can provide, writes Jenny Stewart.

Energy blueprint

UNSW has joined a coalition of prominent Australians to ensure the country's transition to a clean energy future.

Michelle Simmons ARC

All UNSW's top news stories, from quantum computing dollars to a warm welcome for new Deans and dignitaries.

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UNSW scientists have developed an efficient oxygen-producing electrode for splitting water that can be scaled up to produce hydrogen – a clean energy fuel.

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