evolution

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A major study of dingo DNA has revealed the animals most likely migrated to Australia in two separate waves – a find with significant implications for their conservation.

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Geneticists have now firmly established that roughly 2% of the DNA of all living non-African people comes from our Neanderthal cousins, writes Darren Curnoe.

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UNSW Sydney scientists studying microbes from some of the saltiest lakes in Antarctica have discovered a new way that the tiny organisms can share DNA that could help them grow and survive.

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New claims that humans evolved in Europe rather than Africa need to be treated with a good deal of caution, writes Darren Curnoe.

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We may have finally said goodbye to the destructive personal attacks of the past and moved on to figuring out what the Hobbit really is, writes Darren Curnoe.

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Fish on the South Pacific island of Rarotonga evolved the ability to survive out of water because it helped them escape predators in the ocean, new research shows.

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If similarities between the Xichang fossils and modern humans are reflective of shared ancestry, then interbreeding offers a plausible explanation, writes Darren Curnoe.

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The changes we are making to the planet have become so profound that we seemingly hold the evolutionary fate of millions of species in our hands, writes Darren Curnoe.

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Scientists have reconstructed the brain architecture of the enigmatic Tasmanian tiger for the first time, revealing new information about its intelligence and social life.

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It’s often said that through our innovations in science, agriculture and medicine humans have become masters of our biological destiny, writes Darren Curnoe.

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