evolution

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Scientists have reconstructed the brain architecture of the enigmatic Tasmanian tiger for the first time, revealing new information about its intelligence and social life.

crowd

It’s often said that through our innovations in science, agriculture and medicine humans have become masters of our biological destiny, writes Darren Curnoe.

neanderthal

One of the biggest surprises about our evolution is the extent our ancestors engaged in amorous congress with the evolutionary cousins, writes Darren Curnoe.

Lucy

A groundbreaking new study of the bones of our 3.2 million-year-old ancestor ‘Lucy’ has revealed she died from the crushing impact of a fall from high in the trees, writes Darren Curnoe.

China museum

The seeming decline in quality science journalism serves to undermine the public’s confidence in scientific research, writes Darren Curnoe.

midwife

With few exceptions, humans require assistance at birth, usually from an experienced elder, midwife or medical practitioner, and it seems assisted birth is also common among other primates, writes Darren Curnoe.

neanderthal

It’s no exaggeration to say that genetic research is rewriting our understanding of the human evolutionary story, writes Darren Curnoe.

 rock painting

When was the Australian continent first settled, asks Darren Curnoe.

skull

When and where did humans split from the apes to become a separate branch of bipeds, asks Darren Curnoe.

evolution

New research from Asia again looks set to rewrite another chapter in the human story, writes Darren Curnoe.

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