evolutionary biology

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Australia’s largest predator, the dingo, is resistant to one of the main threats to its survival as a species – changes to skull shape brought about by hybridisation, research shows.

Facial reconstruction of Homo erectus from China

Archaeological discoveries in East Asia over the last decade or so have dramatically rewritten our understanding of human evolution, writes Darren Curnoe.

comparisons

We are not only judged on our looks, deeds and works, but also by the company we keep, writes Rob Brooks.

Peacock Spider

With their flamboyant dress, and fabulous song and dance routines, tiny peacock spiders have captivated many hearts. But why does this little Casanova put on such a spectacular show? ask Michael Kasumovic, Damian Elias and Madeline Girard.

Evolution of the backside

Let's get to the bottom of the story. Just why did human backsides become the shape they are? And what purpose do they serve? Find out in the latest episode of our evolution series: How Did We Get Here?

Neanderthal skull

It seems the broad menu of sexual tastes our species enjoys extends back to our Palaeolithic ancestors and includes other hominin species, writes Darren Curnoe.

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Ever wondered what makes us human today? Here's is a sneak peek of a new UNSWTV science series with evolutionary biologist Darren Curnoe. Launches 25 March.

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We still face a major chasm in knowledge about how our thinking and behaviour evolved to be so different from other apes, writes Darren Curnoe.

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Conflict between men and woman pervades every sphere of human life, but decisions about reproduction cause the most angst, writes Professor Rob Brooks. CONFERENCE

Dolphin inside

Having good friends and relatives isn't only valued by humans. In dolphin "families", positive social interactions are more than twice as important as genes in determining successful reproduction, new research shows.

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