extreme weather

Cows standing in water

As the planet continues to warm, extreme weather events such as heatwaves and heavy rainfall are becoming more frequent, intense and longer, according to global weather data.

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Global warming will increase rainfall in some of the world's driest areas over land, with not only the wet getting wetter but the dry getting wetter as well – a phenomenon that could lead to more flash flooding.

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Is climate change to blame for the recent record temperatures? Maybe, but it’s not a simple case of cause and effect, writes Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick.

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The NSW desert has been hit by record-breaking rainfall, with the biggest downpour in 45 years recorded at UNSW’s Fowlers Gap Arid Zone Research Station.

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Winter warmth may be welcome but it can have adverse impacts –  and the damage may not be obvious until it is too late, writes Sarah Perkins.

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Australian water utilities must adapt to extreme weather events if they are to protect vulnerable supplies and ensure clean drinking water into the future, an international report warns.

Climate science VC oped

Research into Australia's unique climate has proven invaluable in dealing with extreme weather events. Shouldn't we also listen to what the research says about global warming? asks Vice-Chancellor Professor Fred Hilmer.

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Increased frequency and intensity of extreme weather events will have unforeseen impacts on the quality of our drinking water, UNSW researchers warn.