extreme weather

Very ominous and dark rain clouds move in over the Sydney Harbour Bridge on an otherwise sunny day

The growing threat of flash flooding as a result of more intense rapid rain bursts means the city needs to update its flood defences.

flooding of town

Australia needs more investment in hydrological modelling and new infrastructure to reduce the impact of major flood events, UNSW expert says.

Avalon rock pool in Sydney in stormy weather

With La Niña prolonging the wet season, there is an increased risk of flooding along the north, east and southeast regions.

Fire fighters hose fire

Academic research can shed light on crucial questions about what life on Earth will be like under the most plausible emissions scenarios. And a warning: the answers are confronting.

Cows standing in water

As the planet continues to warm, extreme weather events such as heatwaves and heavy rainfall are becoming more frequent, intense and longer, according to global weather data.

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Global warming will increase rainfall in some of the world's driest areas over land, with not only the wet getting wetter but the dry getting wetter as well – a phenomenon that could lead to more flash flooding.

water sunset

Is climate change to blame for the recent record temperatures? Maybe, but it’s not a simple case of cause and effect, writes Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick.

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The NSW desert has been hit by record-breaking rainfall, with the biggest downpour in 45 years recorded at UNSW’s Fowlers Gap Arid Zone Research Station.

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Winter warmth may be welcome but it can have adverse impacts –  and the damage may not be obvious until it is too late, writes Sarah Perkins.

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Australian water utilities must adapt to extreme weather events if they are to protect vulnerable supplies and ensure clean drinking water into the future, an international report warns.

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