Gabrielle Appleby

Dancer at the Uluru Constitutional Convention 2017, the Uluru Statement in the Background

The Uluru Dialogue group based at UNSW Indigenous Law Centre says constitutional recognition cannot be dislocated from the idea of a Voice to Parliament.

three indigenous children sitting on a rock and smiling

As a 'Voice' that would allow Indigenous Australians to have a say in parliamentary and government decisions that affect them takes shape, it is vital it be enshrined in our Constitution.

People dressed in corporate attire shaking hands.

UNSW celebrates the Centre’s successful engagement in key public law debates, human rights charters, technology and the law.

Australia shaped Aboriginal flag

The mission of Voice — Treaty — Truth in the Uluru Statement represents very carefully sequenced reforms. A proper understanding of these should guide any constitutional changes.

High Court judges

There is a vacuum within the legal profession that allows sexist, racist and other troubling conduct to go unaddressed. This must change.

indigenous children

Two former high court justices and constitutional experts have thrown their support behind the importance of a First Nations Voice to parliament.

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The proposed Indigenous voice to parliament is nowhere near as radical as the government portrays it, writes Gabrielle Appleby.

corruption

While public hearings may encourage some witnesses to approach an anti-corruption commission, others may be deterred, write Gabrielle Appleby and Grant Hoole.

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The government’s loss of the Solicitor-General's legal acumen and integrity is only the first blow. More serious is the harm done to the office itself, writes Gabrielle Appleby.

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The unprecedented conflict between George Brandis and Commonwealth Solicitor-General Justin Gleeson has potentially serious repercussions for government under the rule of law, writes Gabrielle Appleby.

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