genetics

A sea sponge under water

DNA from the humble sea sponge is shedding light on the "dark matter" that makes up much of our genomes.

emily wong and mathias francois

A jelly-like sea sponge has helped shed light on an elusive part of the human genome, with implications for biomedical research and healthcare.

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A study has outlined how two proteins are instrumental to bringing cholesterol into cells – a finding that has implications for a range of diseases.

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UNSW scientists in Professor Merlin Crossley’s group have shed light on a crucial mechanism in the field of epigenetics, an area of gene regulation.

Male and female lions

Males of most animal species die earlier than females because their smaller Y chromosome is unable to protect an unhealthy X chromosome, research suggests.

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An analysis of dolphin genes has revealed information about their past migrations, showing just how crucial migrants might be for other populations.

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Once genetic lesions for diseases such as cystic fibrosis and haemophilia were identified, the idea of replacing or correcting defective genes grew into what we now call "gene therapy".

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Discover which one of the three major influences holds the master key to body weight regulation.

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Humans, and even pet dogs, are more than just products of genes. As Russell Bonduriansky writes, environments play a vital role in shaping us – even before conception.

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Parents of babies with heart disease want early access to cardiac geneticists and genetic counsellors, new research has found.

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