genetics

sea microbes

Microbes may be tiny, but their huge number and diversity mean they can be used to identify environmental impacts early, potentially limiting greater harm to larger organisms, write Katherine Dafforn, Emma Johnston, Inke Falkner and Melanie Sun.

Merlinlab 1

New results confirm we are on the right track to understanding how molecules that coat DNA influence the activity of disease genes, writes Merlin Crossley.

22 brain 1

Scientists have identified five genetic variants that influence structures within the brain, a discovery that could help determine genetic processes that underlie neuropsychiatric diseases.

15 heart 1

A landmark genetics study involving UNSW researchers offers new hope for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, the most common reason for a heart transplant.

4 Deans Lecture   (27)[1] 1

The human lifespan is too short and marred with ill health. But it doesn't have to be this way, two of the world's leading anti-ageing researchers have told a UNSW audience.

Tempercopy 0

By identifying genes and brain mechanisms that predispose people to violence it may be possible to tailor prevention programs to those who need them most, writes Tom Denson.

Deeplake 1

A UNSW-led team has uncovered the genetic secrets of extremophile microbes that can survive in temperatures as low as minus 20 degrees in the saltiest lake in Antarctica.

DNA2 1

UNSW is hosting the annual conference of the Genetics Society of AustralAsia, with more than 250 scientists gathering to discuss the latest genetic research on a wide variety of animals.

DNA2 0 0

Genes aren’t the be-all-and-end-all – there are other factors that influence you, writes Merlin Crossley.

DNA2 0

The definition of a gene has evolved since the term was first coined in 1909 and needs updating again in the light of recent findings, writes Dean of Science, Professor Merlin Crossley.

Pages